Hi, my name is Thinkie, welcome to my blog!
I'm a student in cultural studies, a museum enthusiast, a scrapbooker and an art journaler. I love to travel within Europe and I enjoy photography. You can read more about me on my homepage.

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Along the orange walkway into (art) history: the reopening of the Rijksmuseum

On Saturday april 13 the newly renovated Rijksmuseum was reopened, as you might have heard if you're Dutch or have an interest in museums. Roeland and I went to Amsterdam that day to catch some of the vibe, and to try to get into the museum (me being, als Roeland called it, quite deprestimistic about our chances on that). When we arrived at the Museumplein, where the museum is located (as are the Stedelijk Museum and the Van Gogh Museum) it was fairly busy but not as extremely as I had anticipated. The ceremonial opening by the queen had been concluded and brass bands were spreading across the square, each playing different music. An announcement was made that in several minutes, the public would be allowed to step onto the orange walkway leading towards the entrance to enter the museum. We found out where the crowd control barriers would be opened and positioned ourselves somewhere nearby. Several minutes turned out to be over half an hour. Then they started letting people trough, in small groups. People started to push towards the opening and it was a bit of a challenge at times not to get seperated by the (fortunately quite civilized) crowd. But eventually we made it onto the orange walkway and walked towards the entrance. There, we encountered another, smaller crowd, and had to wait for a while before we could enter the museum. The museum's entrance hall, mind you, where we spent another half hour or so waiting. But then, finally, we could enter the exhibition rooms! We're pretty sure we were amongst the first 1000 'commoners' (ergo: non-invited people) to visit the museum, maybe even the first 500.

Inside

The museum did well in crowd control: letting people in in small groups at a time, lots and lots of personnel, and a route trough part of the museum that visitors had to follow. This wasn't the time for looking at objects in detail. The idea was for people to get an impression of the renovated museum and the new way the collection is displayed.
I had never visited the Rijksmuseum before so I can't compare now and then, but as I understand it they restored some of the decorations architect Cuypers (had) added to the building in the 19th century, and it looks very nicely decorated.
The way the collection is presented, with different types of fine and decorative art combined with historical objects, illustrating the history of the Netherlands mostly trough art, is one of the things people are raving about. I like it but can't help wondering whether combining works of art and historical objects is really a new thing, or something that used to be common for early museums. The other thing the Rijksmuseum is famous for is the focus on the Dutch Golden Age (17th century). I'm more a fan of late medieval art, but judging from what I saw of the exhibition rooms housing the medieval collection I'm sure to enjoy myself during future visits!


On the yellow brick road the red carpet the orange walkway towards the entrance (photo taken by Roeland)


We made it inside!


Glad we weren't in that line! (Or the one behind it, look closely!)

From the news coverage I've read, seen and heard I liked Simon Schama on the renovated Rijksmuseum
best.

Geplaatst op 18-04-2013.
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